Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday (1953)

Comfy, breezy visual comedy. Monsieur Hulot works as a comic figure much the same way as the postman did in “Jour de Fete”, Tati’s previous (and first) film. The jazzy score is soothing, the seaside setting is pretty, the gags all work pretty well, it’s all a very comfortable experience. The pacing is a bit…

Jour de Fête (1949)

Very fun, comfy exercise in visual comedy. Feels kind of like a silent film in some ways, with how much the focus is on visual gags. Very whimsical atmosphere. Not much meat on the bone, but still a tasty meal. I liked how the geography of the town was set up, and how different parts…

Uzumaki (2000) by Junji Ito

More unsettling, deranged body horror from Junji Ito. Things spiral out of control awfully quickly. Ito mixes the realistic and fantasy elements in a way that’s so horrifying because it feels genuine, visceral. A lot of the story is very b-movie, but the concepts and images really stick in your head no matter the weird…

Gyo (2002) by Junji Ito

Nauseating, disturbing, horrifying. It’s amazing how well Ito evokes scents just through art and dialogue. The descent (de-scent, rather?) into unbridled insanity and body horror just goes on and on beyond any point I’d have thought possible. It’s impossible to look away from, and the speedy, well-maintained pace makes sure it never outstays its welcome.…

The Gambler and Other Stories (1867-1877) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

An excellent collection of some excellent stories. There’s some measure of unity between how the stories are structured together (like two consecutive stories featuring suicide), but for the most part it is just “The Gambler” surrounded by unrelated short stories and novellas. But what stories they are! Four spins of roulette, and a revolver. WHITE…

The Dream of a Ridiculous Man (1877) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

A captivating short story encapsulating a lot of Dostoyevsky’s specific Christian worldview. Dostoyevsky pushes the fantastical elements here more than he usually does, to great effect. Some sections almost resound with science-fiction imagery, being read these days at least, but the theology and morality behind the story really are the driving forces. The prose in…

The Meek One (1876) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

“Long live the electricity of human thought” indeed. Keen, nuanced psychological insight as can be expected from Dostoyevsky. Intriguing structure that really melds the protagonist’s deluded mindset with the progression of the story itself. Dostoyevsky includes an author’s note at the beginning of the story explaining both the nature of the unreliable narrator and the…