Mistborn: The Hero of Ages (2008) by Brandon Sanderson

As was the case for “Mistborn: The Well of Ascension”, much of my thoughts on the original Mistborn trilogy can be found in my review for the first book, “Mistborn: The Final Empire”, so this review is going to be substantially shorter than that one as I outlined my broader thoughts on the series there.…

Dragon Age: Inquisition (2014)

Dragon Age: Inquisition a very worthy entry in the grand, lovable, yet very inconsistent Dragon Age series. Dragon Age II was little like Dragon Age: Origins, and Dragon Age: Inquisition is again a pretty unique entry with its own unique strengths and flaws. The Bioware strengths are at full play here; there’s a fantastic set…

Mistborn: The Well of Ascension (2007) by Brandon Sanderson

Much of my thoughts on the original Mistborn trilogy can be found in my review for the first book, “Mistborn: The Final Empire”, so this review is going to be substantially shorter than that one as I outlined my broader thoughts on the series there. Continuing my thoughts on these Mistborn books as postmodern deconstructions…

Warcraft (2016)

I’m happy to see big budget high fantasy films be made at a Hollywood level like this, and there’s a lot of creativity I admired at play in this film. Some of the visuals are really memorable, a lot of the VFX is fantastic (particularly the orcs, and the way Garona’s skin was digitally edited),…

The Graveyard Book (2008) by Neil Gaiman

A charming children’s fantasy novel by Neil Gaiman. I’m not really a fan of children’s lit, so I never really got into the story as much as its fans do, but I did like the illustrations and some of Gaiman’s more creative ideas. Gaiman is also really skilled at writing to different audiences; this doesn’t…

The Hope of Elantris (2006) by Brandon Sanderson

A very short story set concurrently with the climactic ending chapters of Elantris. I wish I’d read this immediately after finishing Elantris, as it doesn’t work as well as a more standalone short story; it felt kind of incoherent to me at points because I didn’t have the details of the ending fresh in mind.…

Mistborn: The Final Empire (2006) by Brandon Sanderson

In this remarkable postmodern fantasy epic, Brandon Sanderson delights in subverting and deconstructing genre conventions. Set a thousand years after the archetypal hero of monomyth failed, every aspect of the novel – from the worldbuilding, to the characters, to the plot – features some level of subversion and deconstruction of genre conventions, resulting in a…