The Leftovers: Season 2 (2015)

The first season of “The Leftovers” was a captivating look at how people cope with loss and the great unknowable mysteries of life. The second season is a much more ambitious, masterful exploration of religion, the family unit, and self-delusion. The first season was a fantastic adaptation of Tom Perrotta’s “The Leftovers” novel, but the…

The Leftovers: Season 1 (2014)

Like the novel it’s based on, “The Leftovers” is a powerful, enrapturing consideration of how people react to loss and the unknowable. Damon Lindelof (probably most famous for showrunning “Lost”) and the novel’s author himself, Tom Perrotta, together man the series, which is brought to life with the typical HBO prestige drama trappings. There’s a…

The Leftovers (2011)

“The Leftovers” is a captivating rumination on how, at both an individual and societal level, humans react to loss and the unknowable. The mass disappearance of 2% of the world’s population is the central event the novel revolves around, but instead of taking a more science-fiction approach and exploring the cause and purpose of the…

Raw (2016)

“Raw” is a remarkably confident, self-assured, well-made debut film from French director Julia Ducournau. It’s a tale of feminine self-discovery (delightfully so, not watered-down in the slightest) filtered through both the coming-of-age genre and through cannibalism. The premise of the film is already unique and complicated enough that Ducournau pulling it off (which she did,…

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017)

“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” is a much looser, more freeform film than its predecessor. It’s remarkably light on plot for a Marvel film, not in the sense that the plot is thin or undercooked, but in that the plot basically doesn’t show up at all until the third act. The first two acts…

The Lego Batman Movie (2017)

A joyous romp in the bottomless pit of Batman lore. It shares the hypercommercialisation and overt focus on merchandising sales of the Schumacher films, but binds it with a Nolan-esque desire to tell a coherent story and character arc about Batman (and perhaps a Snyder-esque desire to prod and play with his iconography in creative…

The Elephant Man (1980)

David Lynch reigned in the surreal abstractions of his previous film (”Eraserhead”) to deliver a more palatable experience with “The Elephant Man”, but where “Eraserhead” delivered an unnerving dreamscape from where viewers pull their own, usually psychosexual, meanings out of, “The Elephant Man” man depicts a (mostly) true story. A reality, not a dream. It’s…