Rose (2018) by Russell T. Davies

Like Steven Moffat’s “The Day of the Doctor” novel, Russell T. Davies’ “Rose” isn’t really best characterised as a novelisation. It’s too different, too transformative for that. Davies didn’t rewatch the episode before writing the book, quickly discarded the script, and intentionally altered a lot of the lines he did remember precisely, in the interest…

Twice Upon a Time (2018) by Paul Cornell

A very faithful reproduction of the titular Christmas special, for better or worse. Paul Cornell novelising Steven Moffat’s last televised work on Doctor Who feels like it should be a monumental occasion, but what’s on the page is a very literal direct translation of the special into prose, with the odd grace note from Cornell’s…

The Day of the Doctor (2018) by Steven Moffat

A genuine masterwork of the series, easily in contention for Moffat’s crowning achievement with Doctor Who, and I say that as someone cool on the televised fiftieth anniversary in contrast to most. I’d say it’s astounding this is the man’s very first novel, but perhaps that’s the key to its brilliance, as he completely dismisses…

The Disaster Artist (2013)

Greg Sestero’s book “The Disaster Artist” is part exploration of the years before “The Room”, where Greg and Tommy Wisaeu met and befriended each other, part expose on the making of “The Room”, and part character study of Wisaeu himself. It non-linearly criss-crosses between the years before “The Room” and the production of the film…

Film as a Subversive Art (1974) by Amos Vogel

A fantastic resource, one I’ll enjoy returning to many times. As is, I’ve learned a lot from the lines of thinking Vogel proposes, and the connections he draws between various cinematic concepts and works, but lack familiarity with a lot of the specifics works themselves…I look forward to a reread where I try and track…

King Lear (1606) by William Shakespeare

A timeless tale of renunciation and insanity. How mad is it for a play to muse over the powerlessness and ineffectiveness of language? But that’s how King Lear begins, with Cordelia’s refusal to bandy about words for the sake of it (”Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave / my heart into my mouth”), for…

The Village of Stepanchikovo (1859) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Bit toothless and rote for Dostoyevsky, though I appreciate why he’d be wary at this time of his writing life. Some of the social farce works, but it lacks Dostoyevsky’s usual pathos. There’s arguably some development of archetypes Dostoyevsky is honing here, but all the rug-pulling dulls much consistent development. Enjoyable enough, but inessential. Three…