Twice Upon a Time (2018) by Paul Cornell

A very faithful reproduction of the titular Christmas special, for better or worse. Paul Cornell novelising Steven Moffat’s last televised work on Doctor Who feels like it should be a monumental occasion, but what’s on the page is a very literal direct translation of the special into prose, with the odd grace note from Cornell’s…

The Day of the Doctor (2018) by Steven Moffat

A genuine masterwork of the series, easily in contention for Moffat’s crowning achievement with Doctor Who, and I say that as someone cool on the televised fiftieth anniversary in contrast to most. I’d say it’s astounding this is the man’s very first novel, but perhaps that’s the key to its brilliance, as he completely dismisses…

The Disaster Artist (2013)

Greg Sestero’s book “The Disaster Artist” is part exploration of the years before “The Room”, where Greg and Tommy Wisaeu met and befriended each other, part expose on the making of “The Room”, and part character study of Wisaeu himself. It non-linearly criss-crosses between the years before “The Room” and the production of the film…

Doctor Who: Option Lock (1998) by Justin Richards

Another fairly unmemorable entry in the series, no bizarre misguided lapses into the continuity (The Eight Doctors), the past (Genocide), logic and reason (War of the Daleks), but no truly strong characterisation and unique tone (Vampire Science) or sheer creativity (Alien Bodies). It fascinates me how the highest of high stakes in this sort of…

Film as a Subversive Art (1974) by Amos Vogel

A fantastic resource, one I’ll enjoy returning to many times. As is, I’ve learned a lot from the lines of thinking Vogel proposes, and the connections he draws between various cinematic concepts and works, but lack familiarity with a lot of the specifics works themselves…I look forward to a reread where I try and track…

Doctor Who: Kursaal (1998) by Peter Anghelides

Following up Alien Bodies was always going to be a monumental task. I guess, to its credit, Kursaal isn’t an embarrassment like The Eight Doctors or War of the Daleks. It’s not a particular success though. The Eighth Doctor’s memory being a story point, werewolves, science-fiction settings, Sam getting a story with environmentalist elements, all…

Doctor Who: Alien Bodies (1997) by Lawrence Miles

A wonderfully creative, innovative, mad story bursting with imaginative ideas. My issue with this Eighth Doctor Adventures range has been how concerned it has been with the past, when it’s featuring a new Doctor and would be better served creating a new distinct era of its own rather than pandering to eras of the past.…