Neoreaction a Basilisk (2017) by Elizabeth Sandifer

An astonishingly thorough examination of neoreactionism, the strands of thought that led to it, its specific manifestations and ideologies, three men and various media that provide fascinating windows into understanding it, often filtered through other thinkers and media Sandifer herself finds relevant. Sandifer, a doctor who cut her teeth on her unique longform psychochronographic examination…

Guided By The Beauty Of Their Weapons (2015) by Elizabeth Sandifer

A collection of essays, the titular one revolving around the 2015 Hugo Awards controversies, a few circling around similar thematic material, and a few not really related beyond having come from Sandifer or friends. The book is not published anymore, and one is inclined to feel the scrappy assemble-enough-content-and-make-this-eligible-for-a-Hugo vibe, while both a logical and…

The Beguiled (1966) by Thomas Cullinan

A 1966 novel about an injured soldier in the American Civil War slowly recovering in a southern school filled with three women and five teenage girls. The Southern Gothic Americana sort of setting is as appealing and atmospheric as one could expect, and Cullinan makes sure it’s all brimming with subtext, sexuality and repression. The…

Rose (2018) by Russell T. Davies

Like Steven Moffat’s “The Day of the Doctor” novel, Russell T. Davies’ “Rose” isn’t really best characterised as a novelisation. It’s too different, too transformative for that. Davies didn’t rewatch the episode before writing the book, quickly discarded the script, and intentionally altered a lot of the lines he did remember precisely, in the interest…

Twice Upon a Time (2018) by Paul Cornell

A very faithful reproduction of the titular Christmas special, for better or worse. Paul Cornell novelising Steven Moffat’s last televised work on Doctor Who feels like it should be a monumental occasion, but what’s on the page is a very literal direct translation of the special into prose, with the odd grace note from Cornell’s…

The Day of the Doctor (2018) by Steven Moffat

A genuine masterwork of the series, easily in contention for Moffat’s crowning achievement with Doctor Who, and I say that as someone cool on the televised fiftieth anniversary in contrast to most. I’d say it’s astounding this is the man’s very first novel, but perhaps that’s the key to its brilliance, as he completely dismisses…

The Disaster Artist (2013)

Greg Sestero’s book “The Disaster Artist” is part exploration of the years before “The Room”, where Greg and Tommy Wisaeu met and befriended each other, part expose on the making of “The Room”, and part character study of Wisaeu himself. It non-linearly criss-crosses between the years before “The Room” and the production of the film…