Doomsday Clock (2017-2019) by Geoff Johns and Gary Frank

WATCHMEN was a bona fide literary comic, a standalone deconstruction of superheroes, of masked protectors, a pulling-apart of self-appointed hierarchies and relinquished responsibilities. It challenged the reader, not just through the artistry of it all, but the ethical ambiguities and questions it raised. For decades it was left alone – while it had huge impact…

The Golden Compass: The Graphic Novel (2015-2017)

This comic adaption of Philip Pullman’s NORTHERN LIGHTS, first of the HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy, mostly does a good job adapting things into the comic format. The story is abridged, of course, and there are a decent amount of thought-out changes to try and channel the flow of information and sequence of plot in a…

Before Watchmen (2012-2013)

Before BEFORE WATCHMEN, there was just…WATCHMEN. Twelve issues across 1986 and 1987, the product of writer Alan Moore, artist Dave Gibbons, and colourist John Higgins. It was a standalone work, and much of its strength (and resultant praise) was related to that, to the singular nature of the work, how it told one connected story…

Watchmen (1986-1987) by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons

WATCHMEN was created by writer Alan Moore and artist Dave Gibbons (as well as colourist John Higgins) in the mid-1980s, as a set of twelve comic issues telling their own standalone story. There was reason to expect it would be a success. Moore was already a well-known writer, everyone else involved were skilled as well,…

Uzumaki (2000) by Junji Ito

More unsettling, deranged body horror from Junji Ito. Things spiral out of control awfully quickly. Ito mixes the realistic and fantasy elements in a way that’s so horrifying because it feels genuine, visceral. A lot of the story is very b-movie, but the concepts and images really stick in your head no matter the weird…

Gyo (2002) by Junji Ito

Nauseating, disturbing, horrifying. It’s amazing how well Ito evokes scents just through art and dialogue. The descent (de-scent, rather?) into unbridled insanity and body horror just goes on and on beyond any point I’d have thought possible. It’s impossible to look away from, and the speedy, well-maintained pace makes sure it never outstays its welcome.…

Dishonored: The Wyrmwood Deceit (2016) by Gordon Rennie, Andrea Olimpiere, & Marcelo Maiolo

This four-piece comic run is the second piece of tie-in media released in the months prior to “Dishonored 2”, along with the novel “Dishonored: The Corroded Man”. Since so many of the series’ strengths are visual in nature, with the creative worldbuilding and aesthetics far more impressive than the more meagre characters and stories, the comic inherently had…