The Brides of Dracula (1960)

A Van Helsing sequel, with Dracula only appearing in the film’s title. Recontextualising the 1958 film as basically just another day in the life of Van Helsing as he goes about stamping evil, that was an interesting idea, but the individual story of this film isn’t of huge interest. A mother hiding her vampire son,…

Dracula (1958)

A very fast-paced adaption of the book, of a style that seems immediately full-formed and distinct from previous versions of DRACULA. The fangs, red contact lenses, ready-made wooden stakes, a lot of iconic Dracula imagery comes from here, not least of which is Christopher Lee’s more directly sexual take on the count. Lugosi was handsome,…

Dracula (1931)

Two fantastic performances (Bela Lugosi’s Dracula, Dwight Fyre’s Renfield), a few delightfully weird little touches (a sudden cut to possums and insects creeping when Dracula and his wives exit their coffins), and a brilliant score by Phillip Glass added to the film decades after its release, all these things anchor what’s a surprisingly thin and…

Vampyr (1932)

Interesting old vampire film, only a year after the famed Bela Lugosi film, and so quite decoupled from the whole Dracula myth. Ethereal and creepy, but somewhat ambling and dull for a lot of the runtime. The camera movements are well-considered, but there’s a kind of disconnect between what feel like more improvisational visual sequences,…

Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979)

A beautiful remake of the 1922 NOSFERATU film. Unlike that film, Herzog actually has the rights to the DRACULA novel here, so names are updated accordingly (Orlock to Dracula, etc.) although all the other changes of the original are retained, like Renfield being Harker’s boss and so on. The locations are beautiful, the tone is…

Shadow of the Vampire (2000)

The idea for this film is fantastic – what if the mysterious actor Max Schreck, 1922’s titular Nosferatu, was in fact a real vampire? But it’s one of those ideas that’s difficult to really justify a whole story around. It’s a tantalising idea on its own, or even just a joke of its own, but…

Le Vampire (1945)

An interesting, rather surreal French documentary about vampire bats. Something of a cross between a nature documentary and a horror film, set to a Duke Ellington backing track. Seeing a guinea pig get the full vampire treatment from a vampire bat is more horrifying than a lot of the vampire theatrics in a Dracula film…