Casino (1995)

A crime epic very much in the style of GOODFELLAS. Where GOODFELLAS covered a more classical rise and fall, CASINO is almost a picaresque. Characters are a lot more static, and a broader theme of systemic corruption plays out, not just in the violent theatrics, but smaller-scale nepotistic concerns and the like. Things are gaudier…

The Color of Money (1986)

More or less a sequel to THE HUSTLER, the 1961 pool film with Paul Newman, with Newman reprising his role decades later here, as a mentor figure to Tom Cruise’s up-and-coming character. This comes early in Scorsese’s career, back when more commercial films (like BOXCAR BERTHA) were a necessity for him to continue making films…

The Age of Innocence (1993)

There’s a lot of novel to churn through here, and the scenes with narration feel in step with that (as opposed to the more evocative, immersive character narration of GOODFELLAS), but Scorsese more than puts his mark on Edith Wharton’s staple novel here. The fades to colour, characters delivering readings of letters direct to camera…

The Golden Compass: The Graphic Novel (2015-2017)

This comic adaption of Philip Pullman’s NORTHERN LIGHTS, first of the HIS DARK MATERIALS trilogy, mostly does a good job adapting things into the comic format. The story is abridged, of course, and there are a decent amount of thought-out changes to try and channel the flow of information and sequence of plot in a…

The Golden Compass [video game] (2007)

They’re uncommon now, but tie-in video games used to be very common. A blockbuster movie would get an accompanying video game, usually on near every video game platform available at the time, even when that led to functionally very different versions of the game depending on the platform (i.e., in this case, the Nintendo DS…

The Subtle Knife (1997) by Philip Pullman

THE SUBTLE KNIFE is a rare sequel in what it doesn’t do. It doesn’t immediately follow up on the previous book, it takes its time following the characters of the previous book (and it only follows some), it immediately differs sharply in tone…it’s jarring, and one could even find it to feel more like a…

War of the Worlds (2005)

An excellent rendition of terror, of the utter fear of being hunted, dominated, destroyed. The film opens on KOYAANISQATSI-esque shots of humans busying themselves about, while Morgan Freeman narrates from H. G. Wells’ novel, talking of aliens scrutinising humans while they went about their lives unawares. After a quick establishment of the tropes Spielberg puts…